Posts Tagged ‘photography’

Shameless Photography needs your help.

February 3, 2010

Are you willing to donate something to the cause of body-positive, radically fun pinup photography?

Calling all those lovely garments that have spent years languishing in the closet, just dying for stardom — this is their chance to shine.

Shameless Photography wants you to become part of the new all-star, all-size Shameless pinup wardrobe!  Think of all those neglected yet fabulous garments in your wardrobe — give me your ripped seams, your broken zippers, your loose hems yearning to breathe free!

They will be lovingly restored and brought back to life. A call for all those dresses, skirts, blouses, and, yes, lingerie that never fit quite right but you had to bring home because it was so pretty.

Calling all those heels, bathing suits, stockings, and accessories that would like to become part of something larger than themselves.

By popular need/demand, I’m trying to build a wardrobe for my clients of all sizes — and I can’t do it without your help.  I’m looking for clothes and lingerie to fit and flatter everyone. Some of the items on my wish list are: vintage dresses, full skirts, pencil skirts, low-cut shirts and dresses, bustiers, corsets, shrugs, fur or faux fur, polka dots, bra and panty sets.  Vintage clothes or clothes with a retro feel are best, but I can also alter garments to make them more vintage-looking.

I have a lot of shoots coming up, so time is of the essence.  Please email me at shamelessphotography@gmail.com.  If you’re in New York, I would be happy to come to your apartment and pick up any donations, or if you are willing to bring them to an event we’re both attending, that would be amazing.  If you are farther away, I’ll pay your postage.

Thank you in advance for your help.  PLEASE FORWARD THIS WIDELY!  The more is definitely the merrier.

Advertisements

Shameless.

December 1, 2009

My new flyer for Shameless Photography, my pinup makeover and portraiture business:

Taking the leap.

November 25, 2009

“We work to become, not to acquire.” — Elbert Hubbard

“Work and love are the cornerstones of our humanness.” — Sigmund Freud

“It is your work in life that is the ultimate seduction.” — Pablo Picasso

When I graduated from college five years ago, I wanted a good job. I was passionate, ambitious, and idealistic, and I was dedicated to making a difference. But how do people actually produce real and lasting change in the world?

When I accepted my first non-profit job, I was thrilled. I joined a young policy institute with a talented, devoted, and collaborative staff. The organization’s leadership was fantastic, its projects were important, and I was given many opportunities to learn and grow. I was promoted from intern to director in three years, and was handed increasingly challenging and significant projects.

So why wasn’t I happy? Before, I’d worked mind-numbing corporate or factory jobs, so discontent made sense. How could I be chafing against working for good?

Scary question. Was I just lazy? Did I lack integrity? Was I destined to disappoint and flounder, to never really contribute?

The answer I finally arrived at required a leap of faith: I needed to trust myself enough to believe that I wasn’t the problem. I simply hadn’t yet found the right work for me.

When I finally gave notice, my co-workers were bewildered. When people left my organization, they usually went on to grander things — law school, public office, leadership positions with other organizations. But I was plan-less. Without plan.

The day after I left work for good, I packed my bags and hit the road, traveling from Brooklyn to Asheville to Austin to San Francisco and back again, worrying about exhausting my savings but knowing I needed to move.

I could live anywhere, I thought. I could be anyone.

Choice is a powerful thing.

And my natural frugality was further terrorized when I made the decision to buy a camera. Not some chintzy point-and-shoot job, mind you. A real camera, a Nikon, gleaming and black and fragile and powerful. I fell passionately in love.

My way of seeing began to change almost immediately. I would think That’s a good shot, at least three times a day. Then ten. Then thirty. It was as if a frame had appeared in my view. Everywhere I looked, I could move the frame up or down, from side to side, and see things differently.

I returned to Brooklyn with a plan. Shameless Photography!  This is my mission statement:

In a culture where we’re constantly bombarded by images, messages, and standards designed to make us feel inadequate and insecure about our faces and our bodies, I aim to create a space where women can feel safe, beautiful, and empowered. Using makeup, lighting, and photography, I create images that are part fantasy, part reality — and entirely gorgeous.

To become a fantasy — and to know that you can do so whenever you want — is a powerful thing. No billboard model, no advertising agency can own the realm of fantasy — we all do.

In some small way, I hope that my photos can help women feel more empowered and more embodied — and to see our femininity as a space of play, pleasure, and possibility, rather than one of shame.

It’s only been a couple of months since I set up shop, and I’m still working to spread the word and get my fledgling business off the ground. But I can honestly say that I’m happier than I’ve been in years. I think about my work all the time, with passion and excitement and drive. I’ve never felt this way before — never has work been such an effortless, animal pleasure. I find myself staying up till 4 a.m. with only Photoshop to keep me company — and loving it.

Money will be tight, but I’m doing something I believe in, something that challenges me, feeds me, frees me. If the supreme accomplishment is to blur the line between work and play, I think I’m beginning to do just that.